October 10, 2008

Screen Printing: Part 2

Okay, FINALLY, here are the results from my very first screen printing project! Each year The Center for Cartoon Studies makes a "Facebook" for the new batch of first year students. Each student (and Fellows, like me!) creates a self-portrait which they screen print with two colors on cardstock. Then all of the portraits are assembled into a book!

I have resisted learning screen printing for years now, because I thought it might tempt me into making screen printed covers for my minicomics (which would only take LONGER to make). Well, I can now safely say that such a thing will never happen. Because it is SOOOO much work to create a screen printed image! I'm glad I learned how, but I'll be surprised if I use this technology again while I am at CCS... I will say that I now have a much greater appreciation for screen printed comics!

Anyway, as you can probably tell here, I printed the red layer first and then the brown layer on top. There were only so many paper colors to choose from, so I chose yellow, to keep things warm. The image represents a sort of "before" and "after" comparison for how I will look this year! I made 60 copies, which was enough to bruise and blister my hands. I've got a few more images to make for the book, and then I'm probably going to hang up my screen for a good long while!

3 comments:

Ajani said...

If it's enough to bruise and blister your hands it must be a lot of work...

Anyway, lookin' good! I've made connections with a guy here who does a lot of printing, and I made a few monoprints about 2 weeks ago. I'd like to learn screen printing someday just to know what all the hubbub is about.

Ricko said...

Looks good! I've never tried it but I wonder if Print Gocco is less labor intensive?

Alec Longstreth said...

Yeah, Gocco is easier, but there is also a size restriction (it can only handle about a postcard sized area) this was 8.5" x 11" so it had to be screen printed.

It's definitely worth giving a try Ajani! I think you could really get into the interplay between colors and paper color, etc.